We are changing the way development works:
block by block,
neighborhood by neighborhood,
city by city.

A people and market driven platform that forges a more equitable approach to real estate development.

Equitable Development

REDI believes in a future where all people are able to thrive in their chosen community

REDI challenges development that values profit over people

REDI holds real estate developers to a higher professional standard

 

Redi Results
  • Empowered Communities

    REDI empowers communities to manage and increase their real estate assets through education and outreach. REDI develops tools that communities can use to select and hold developers accountable to their interests.

  • Accountable Developers

    REDI rates developers track record on equitable development measures. REDI promotes a community of learning for developers to increase their social impact by meeting community needs, gaining access to socially conscious investors, and working with governments to address demands in the built environment.

  • Responsible Investors

    REDI works with a growing pool of socially responsible investors. REDI partners with investors, government agencies, and REDI certified developers to create monetizing incentives.

  • Effective Legislators

    REDI helps governments make better selection of urban developers by leveraging REDI ratings and by providing concrete tools for engaging communities in decision making.

REDI People

REDI engages people in creating solutions to a problem that’s been given many names: gentrification, displacement, inequitable development...

I Always Wanted to Build Homes

As far back I can remember, I wanted to build homes. My mother built our home in Haiti at a time when buying land, securing capital, working with an architect, and managing contractors was not recognized as something a woman could handle.

I want to see more people from the communities that need investment working in this industry.

Mia Rogers
MWBE General Contractor
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Mia Rogers

MWBE General Contractor

I want to see more people from the communities that need investment working in this industry.

Equitable development means that you are not just building and revitalizing property but also helping people to eat, play, and live well in their communities. We work with the city of Baltimore to hire local residents. This is my equitable movement contribution–employing people that are deemed unemployable so they can reinvest in themselves, their families, and neighborhoods.

Real estate development is seen as being a good but there are underlying social questions that get ignored when thinking of it just in terms of market value.

Dayna Cunningham
Executive Director, MIT CoLab
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Dayna Cunningham

Executive Director, MIT CoLab

Real estate development is seen as being a good but there are underlying social questions that get ignored when thinking of it just in terms of market value.

There are two different ways of creating value. One is typical neighborhood development and the other leads with social based values. Rewarding those who sustain the  community with housing by supporting the livelihood of humans in the area. The thing I like about REDI is that it makes this visible. Now there is a way for a richer set of metrics to be used to determine investment for those with social goals.


The best thing about REDI is that it's not acting from a charitable impulse. REDI is an investor that seeks to work with communities and people in creating a sustained economic engine.

Wendell Pierce
Actor & REDI Thought Partner
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Wendell Pierce

Actor & REDI Thought Partner

The best thing about REDI is that it's not acting from a charitable impulse. REDI is an investor that seeks to work with communities and people in creating a sustained economic engine.

The 21st century social justice movement is economic development. In the 20th century, we memorialized how you empower yourself and organize community in changing laws and politics, understanding that laws can change people’s behavior. The movement then understood that beliefs may not change but that by forcing behavior to change through legal means, we can move the needle. Now we have to add the second part of that equation to make sure that economic development comes into our communities because that is true empowerment. Change has to mean lasting impact on people’s lives; it has to have a tangible impact. Ultimately, political and cultural power are sustained by economic power. Developing a sustained economic engine for our communities has to be part of the solution. That is the next step.

The best thing about REDI is that it’s not just acting from a charitable impulse. It seeks to be a real investor in communities, which expects growth and return for communities and investors…for everyone. REDI understands that historically governments have given investments to some communities and handouts to others. It seeks to invest in communities and people that we have failed to invest in. It is using every facet of development to merge the social investor with communities, government, public lands and public investments. REDI makes it possible for the private and public sector to come together in a mutually beneficial way.

Developers have to be orchestra conductors that quietly let everyone shine, enabling ideas to stick, allowing projects to take root.

Thibault Manekin
Developer, Seawall Developers
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Thibault Manekin

Developer, Seawall Developers

Developers have to be orchestra conductors that quietly let everyone shine, enabling ideas to stick, allowing projects to take root.

A social entrepreneur is someone whose main focus is on making society better and who can creatively think of out-of-the-box ways to go about doing that. For us, that’s through real estate. We don’t want to be thought of as developers. We want to be thought of as a company that uses the built environment to help make cities better places to live, work and play — both by the projects we develop and most importantly by the people we put in them. Developers have to be orchestra conductors that quietly let everyone shine, enabling ideas to stick, allowing projects to take root.

The story of Miller’s Court demonstrates our philosophy of listening and making sure that the people who will reside in the space that we built are part of the decision making process. A bunch of teachers working in schools in the area approached us saying they wanted to live where they taught but had challenges finding apartments. They also said that they would like to lean on each other as teachers even when we’re not in school.  And so when we decided to work with the teachers to create an affordable apartment complex, we knew that it would be more than just a place for teachers to rest their heads.  The teachers designed every inch of the building; they chose their own amenities. As a result, the LEED Gold Certified building includes lots of meeting spaces and a resource center for the teachers, office spaces for non-profits, and a cooperatively owned independent cafe in the building.

A good developer knows that the end user must ultimately decide what gets built. It’s the community that’s been staring at the dilapidated building for decades or envisioning what can be built on the vacant lot in the neighborhood. They are the ones who will live with the developed sites for generations to come. To be a good developer, you must fall back and really listen.

National League of Cities Launches First-Ever Equitable Economic Development Fellowship

The Equitable Economic Development Fellowship is a two-year, $1 million effort to help equity, transparency, sustainability and community engagement become driving forces in local economic development efforts.